Full field image taken by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center July 15 1999, 13:00:14. (below)     Full field image taken by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center July 15 1999, 13:06:03. (below)    
                     
  The Sun is 4.5 billion years old and has used up half of the hydrogen in its core. It will continue to radiate for another 5 billion years, its luminosity doubling in that time. Then it will run out of hydrogen fuel and will be forced into radical changes. (above)     Full field image taken by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center July 15 1999, 14:12:11. (above)     Full field image taken by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center July 15 1999, 13:19:10. (above)  
                     
           
                     
  The three photographs of the total solar eclipse of 1995 Oct 24 were taken by Fred Espenak of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from the small town of Dundlod, India. The eclipse was unique for its low altitude (23 ) and short duration (40 seconds), due to the fact that the Moon was only 1.1% larger than the Sun.   The highly rarified region above the chromosphere, called the corona, extends millions of kilometers into space but is visible only during eclipses (left). Temperatures in the corona are over 1,000,000 K.   White light coronameter images from the High Altitude Observatory Mauna Loa (Hawaii), July 15 1999.  
                     
           
                     
 

No copyright is asserted for these images.These images may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA or by any NASA employee of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if these images are used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.

All of the images presented in NASA's Eclipse Site are in the public domain. As such, they may be used for any purpose. NASA/ NSSDC do ask, however, that you acknowledge NSSDC as the supplier of the data. In addition, where the source of the image (by project or as a specific person) is credited in the text, you should also acknowledge that, too.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston TX 77058

     
                     

Back to NASA Links Chat Rooms FAQs Museums Home Media Gallery Exploratorium Amazing Facts The Moon The Sun Eclipses and Math Connection Eclipses Through Traditions and Cultures Overview